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You are viewing 5 events for 23 July 2018

*FREE COURSE* Teaching with Primary Sources: Comics + Graphic Novels

Comics + Graphic Novels as Primary Sources

This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as social commentary in the U.S., using the resources of the Library of Congress. Consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as well as some graphic design principles to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants plan classroom activities focusing on this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students in discussions. Projects include researching and evaluating comics, hands-on printing and design activities, lesson plan development, and more. Content appropriate to many subjects; connects tohistory, social science and visual literacy.

Learn more + register here.

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ArtsWeek 2018: UArts

The University of the Arts
July 23 - 27, 2018

At the University of the Arts, creativity in all its forms overlaps and converges. UArts is the first and only university in the United States solely dedicated to educating creative individuals in the visual, performing and communication arts. We believe in the creative process as a transformative force for society.

Our campus in Center City Philadelphia stretches for six blocks along the Avenue of the Arts from Walnut Street to South Street. Philadelphia is overflowing with stories to tell, scenes to capture, people to meet, museums to explore, restaurants to sample and performances to ponder. This city offers a distinctive blend of old and new. Broad Street gives way to narrow alleys and large boulevards. History, technology, and artistic creativity mingle on city corners. Philadelphia is home to an astounding collection of museums, artistic venues and historical attractions. These include the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Fabric Workshop and Museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Mütter Museum, and the National Constitution Center.
 

Studio Choices:


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*FREE COURSE* Teaching with Primary Sources: City as Primary Source

The City as Primary Source: Connecting the City, Local Collections, and the Library of Congress

Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. The City provides a vast array of primary source material to help understand history, culture, and identity. In this course, educators will examine the city of Philadelphia - its layout and geography, architecture, and the art it inspires - as a primary source. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to sites around the city and local collections, as well as from the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include guided tours of historical and cultural attractions, an architect-led walking tour of significant buildings in the city, and a site visit with a working artist including a hands-on studio activity. Comfortable attire and footwear are suggested for participants in this course, as walking is required, and most sites are outdoors.


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*FREE COURSE* Teaching with Primary Sources: A is for Everything

A is for Everything: How Typography Shapes our Language and Culture

Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will traces histories, narratives, and connections in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. We regularly interact with typefaces and designes that were forged thousands of years ago. Over 500 years ago, Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture.


This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participants to think critically and openly about how type and design shape our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, with guest lectures and an artist studio visit. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to history, science and technology.


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UArts Continuing Education Digital Photography Program welcomes guest speaker Keith Yahrling

Keith will discuss his two most recent bodies of work, What Was Lost At Fort Sill (2016-ongoing) and For the Revolution (2012-2015). Both bodies of work explore the psyche of the American landscape and examine how he interjects with the history of the places he photographs.
 
Join us to learn about Keith's process, what it is like to work on long term personal projects, and a small segment of American history.
 
This event is free and open to the public.
Keith Yahrling

Keith Yahrling

Keith Yahrling is an artist based in Philadelphia who received his MFA in Photography from the Rhode Island School of Design. He was selected as one of PDN’s 30: New & Emerging Photographers to Watch for 2015. He recently mounted a solo exhibition at the Workspace Gallery in Lincoln, NE and has been included in group exhibitions at the Aperture Foundation, the Perkins Center for the Arts, and the Annenberg Space for Photography. His current body of work, What Was Lost At Fort Sill, investigates the cyclical actions of soldiers on an army base nearly 50 years after his father was stationed there.
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