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The Arts

    • PIE 016

Current neuroscience and cognitive science research establishes that arts education can help boost test scores across disciplines and lends support for the need for arts in schools. A substantive arts education includes comprehensive experiences in the visual and performing arts. Learn how the process of creating can provide learning and innovation skills such as creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration. This course is designed for K-12 teachers in all subjects.

Course
Credits
Notes
  • Foundations of Integrating the Arts into the Classroom
3.00
Recommended first course

Brain based research indicates that integrating arts learning into the curriculum assists learners in the full acquisition of new knowledge. This course builds on educators existing knowledge base in the arts and teaches them to apply current research techniques and strategies to the development and implementation of their arts curricula. Educators study the research about arts learning and how it can increase the likelihood that students will acquire a deeper understanding of content and develop higher retention levels.

Select 9 credits from courses with subject code VPAS. Courses may include:

  • 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Ceramics - Throwing
3.00

This course explores both traditional and experimental throwing techniques to make functional and sculptural pots. Develop a repertoire of skills, improve competency thinking and working three-dimensionally and incorporate new methods to encourage craftsmanship and conceptual skills in students. Focus on the potential of the potter’s wheel as a tool for expression. This course provides an opportunity for personal invention and exploration in developing sound skills to take back to the classroom. Learn throwing techniques with stoneware clays for both the beginning and advanced student. In addition, discover finishes experimenting with colored slips, under glazes, oxides, shop glazes and firing techniques.

  • 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Ceramics Raku
3.00

Raku is a form of Japanese pottery that uses low firing temperatures and removal from the kiln while still hot, creating a unique surface finish, often with crackled textures. Raku techniques have been adopted and modified by contemporary potters worldwide. In this course, explore the techniques of Raku firing and the qualities of this approach.

  • 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Fiber Arts
3.00

Explore general fiber techniques and fabric processes, including weaving, stamp printing, dyeing and basic construction as an introduction to working with these materials. With demonstrations, discussions and hands-on projects, learn vocabulary and process of working with this media and the technical requirements and considerations to bring these approaches into the curriculum. Content is applicable to K-12 classrooms, particularly to expand knowledge of 3-D concepts with students. Open to all teachers with interest in fibers, no previous fiber experience required.

  • 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Glass Fusing + Slumping
3.00

Explore an overview of basic glass techniques as an introduction to this material. Hands-on projects include fusing and slumping (bending), framework and basic casting. Those new to glass discover the technical aspects of working in both the hot and cold shops and discuss types of glass to use, the compatibilities of glass, annealing schedules and using sheet glass with powdered frit. Content applicable to K-12 classrooms, particularly to expand knowledge of 3-D concepts. Open to all teachers with interest in glass, no previous experience required.

  • 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Jewelry - Metal Clay
3.00

Metal clay is an amazing material that is well adapted to classroom use. It is metallic clay made of either pure silver or bronze, which molds and handles like putty, fires in a kiln and becomes solid permanent silver. This material is unique, safe and non-toxic and requires only simple tools and equipment that students of all ages can easily use. In this course, work with various forms in both silver and bronze to produce basic jewelry or small sculptural objects, covering topics such as wet and dry fabrication, firing times and temperatures, use of the kiln and alternative firing methods. Topics may include projects for students, simple tool making and rubber molding, other basic jewelry techniques and use of metal elements and alloys in jewelry. Course content is designed for application in art classrooms.

  • 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Traditional Jewelry Techniques
3.00

Participants learn basic fabrication techniques such as hollow construction, linkage, chain making, forming and fabrication. With demonstrations, discussions and hands-on projects, this course provides an overview to the vocabulary and process of working with metals and an understanding of the technical requirements and considerations to bring these skills into the curriculum. Content applicable to K-12 art classrooms, particularly to expand knowledge of 3-D concepts and construction with students. No previous jewelry experience required.

  • Integrating Design Fundamentals - Projects for the Classroom
3.00

This course presents a step-by-step approach to understanding what causes one to look at a painting, photograph or any 2-D media and what is needed to maintain visual interest. This method applies aspects of line, shape, value and color directly to moving the viewer’s eye to and through a composition. With studio projects and hands-on exercises reinforcing concepts, vocabulary and visual organization, participants strengthen their own design thinking skills and develop new methods to convey and explain design to students. Applicable to the fine arts, applied arts and digital media, this course provides a simple and comprehensive methodology through which artists can create dynamic art.

  • History + Philosophy of Murals for Educators
3.00

Course description coming soon!

  • Integrating Performing Arts in the K-5 Classroom
3.00

  • Mural Arts + Storytelling for the Classroom
3.00

  • Printmaking for the Classroom: Book Arts
3.0

Course description coming soon!

  • Printmaking for the Classroom: Monoprinting
3.00

This class addresses image making through basic printmaking media such as relief, monoprinting and collographs. Create images by drawing/painting directly on the plate or by working from a sketch. The creative process is analyzed at every point. Techniques covered include printing with water-based inks and multiple colors as well as working with non-traditional presses that can be used in a variety of classroom settings.

  • Printmaking for the Classroom: Screen Printing
3.0

This course is an introduction to stencil methods in screen printing with water-based inks. Demonstrations in screen printing techniques are followed by hands-on work in stencil preparation, mixing of pigments, registration processes, pulling a print and presentation, including development and application of various hand-cut and photo stencils. Course includes idea development and application of visual skills in expression of color, line and form through drawn, photographic or computer-generated stencil processes. Emphasis is on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of screen printed opaque and transparent colors. Discussion and consideration of application to K-12 art classrooms is also included.

  • Visual Arts for the Classroom: Digital Photography
3.00

Explore, refine and improve general techniques relating to digital photography, including camera functions, image storage and final output options. In addition, composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued. Some basic post-production techniques using Photoshop are introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device.

  • Visual Arts for the Classroom: Drawing + Painting
3.00

Consider narrative concepts as conveyed or enhanced through visual images. Using primarily museum and art history resources, as well as selected children's books, participants consider how images convey meaning themselves or are used in conjunction with text to tell stories. Look at the works of illustrators such as Maurice Sendak, Eric Carle, Faith Ringgold and Beatrix Potter to discuss the relationship of image with text. Study works by artists Henri Matisse, Edward Hopper, Henri Rousseau, Romare Bearden and Jacob Lawrence, whose work contains strong narrative elements to explore how images alone can convey a story. Discover studio projects, presentations and hands-on exercises that can be replicated directly to help students increase their visual literacy skills and enhance learning. Designed primarily for K-8 educators.

  • Visual Arts for the Classroom: Landscape Painting
3.00

Work from direct observation to cover concepts in landscape with emphasis on an in-the-field approach. In addition to producing finished paintings, discuss the concepts of place, scale, the nature of light and the balance of man and nature. Work outdoors in the local area, including Chanticleer Garden, to address the process of working with the immediacy of changing conditions. Participants may choose oil, acrylic or pastel for their medium. Topics include proper grounds (surfaces) for oil paint, as well as materials, mediums and techniques for efficient use of time. Discussions include choosing a location, reading the weather, reading the light, and color mixing for landscape. Educators should have previous experience in basic drawing and painting.

  • Visual Storytelling Techniques for Educators
3.00

Consider narrative concepts as conveyed or enhanced through visual images. Using primarily museum and art history resources, as well as selected children's books, participants consider how images convey meaning themselves or are used in conjunction with text to tell stories. Look at the works of illustrators such as Maurice Sendak, Eric Carle, Faith Ringgold and Beatrix Potter to discuss the relationship of image with text. Study works by artists Henri Matisse, Edward Hopper, Henri Rousseau, Romare Bearden and Jacob Lawrence, whose work contains strong narrative elements to explore how images alone can convey a story. Discover studio projects, presentations and hands-on exercises that can be replicated directly to help students increase their visual literacy skills and enhance learning. Designed primarily for K-8 educators.

  • World Cultures Through Art - Projects for the Classroom
3.00

Explore multiculturalism through the examination of five world cultures using art images and projects as a tool to engage students. Asia (China, Japan), West Africa, India, Mexico and Morocco (North Africa) are all touched upon with a general overview of essential social traditions, cultural icons and customs. Develop hands-on art projects and applicable studio activities that can be used within social science, history, art and other subject areas. Studios consider gesture, costume, textiles and imagery as the basis for drawing and collage exercises easily adapted for a range of students. Class includes a visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Lessons and activities are open to beginners seeking artistic projects in their classrooms, as well as those with previous art experience.

Open elective from any concentration
area
          3.00
   
  

Total Minimum Required for
Concentration/Certificate:

                         15.0                           5 courses