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PIE + MEd Graduate Course Catalogue

A complete listing of courses + course descriptions for all programs offered through the Professional Institute for Educators + MEd Programs.

Summer 2017
2017 MEd Catalogue
  • 2017 MEd Catalogue
    • Become part of a network of experienced educators, form bonds and learn from each other.

Professional Institute for Educators Courses

Courses listed below are for non-matriculated students ONLY.  
Please refer to the COURSE NOTES section for in-person meeting dates for Hybrid courses.

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Course Instructor Dates + Times Location Credits + Fees
Integrating ePublishing into the Curriculum
ETEC 517NM 01
Kenneth Kay
  • Fall 2017
  • Nov 08 to Dec 06
CS Online Course

This course provides instruction in eBook resources and authoring tools. It will cover the broad free ePublishing resources for accessing ebooks, creating ebooks and determining which tools to use, depending on the targeted audience and degree of multimedia content. Students will first examine the impact of interactive ebooks on learning and the ebook formats and then concentrate on locating and sharing ebooks of various genres (i.e., fiction, nonfiction and textbooks). The last component of the course will involve incorporating free tools to create interactive reading books, textbooks, magazines, posters and pamphlets.

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Integrating Media Literacy into Today's K-12 Classroom
ETEC 501NM 01
Scott Duggan
  • Fall 2017
  • Sep 26 to Oct 24
  • Tue, Thu 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Unionville ES

Media education has become a growing priority in today's classroom because of the extent of the media's importance in people's lives. However, many teachers are unaware of the necessity and the techniques for making media literacy an integral part of the K-12 educational experience. On average, children in their middle and high school years spend 6-10 hours a day engaged either actively or passively in some sort of media-related activity. Because students, regardless of their learning style, attend more fully to activities and ideas that they connect with, media is often used to influence them from a very young age. This makes it necessary for teahers to "train" their students to analyze messages and understand the techniques utilized to influence them via a broad range of sound and visual communication technologies so they can function in the 21st century. Learn how to incorporate media literacy into your classroom curriculum, regardless of the subject taught. This course will provide you with the resources necessary to help students hone their critical thinking skills in a functional context so they are able to recognize various marketing approaches, identify propaganda, understand stereotypes, critically evaluate media conveyed messages, and use the media as a tool for life-long learning.

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Integrating Technology into the Curriculum
ETEC 512NM 01
Scott Duggan
  • Summer 2017
  • Jul 06 to Aug 03
CS Online Course

This course shows how a single computer can be the essential resource in a teacher's repertoire. Use it as a learning tool by building a daily rotation of student activities on the computer. Use it as a personal productivity tool by developing databases, spreadsheets and mail merges. Use it as a presentation tool to display slide shows created in Apple iWorks' presentation feature, and use the Internet to explore a whole world of information.

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Interactive Presentations
ETEC 518NM 01
Maria Geiger
  • Summer 2017
  • Jul 24 to Aug 18
CS Online Course

While Powerpoint and Prezi are options, they are nowhere near the only options, with which to create interactive presentations for use in today's classroom. Browser-based applications present countless presentation features to help foster student engagement, interaction, assessment, and communication. This course will explore the web's potential for interactivity, including slideshows and videos, back channeling, 3-D, animations, interactive whiteboards, screencasting, online debates, collaboration, and brainstorming tools. All applications introduced in the course are free, with iPad-approved options available for those teachers who use them in their classrooms.

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Intergrating Museum Resources into the Classroom
PRES 588NM 01
Jacqueline Cassidy
  • Fall 2017
  • Oct 28 to Nov 11
  • Sat, Sun 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
UArts

How do we effectively and routinely bring museum resources into our classrooms? This course offers educators a broad understanding of how to locate and use museum resources as lesson planning tools, to guide inquiry-based learning and curriculum development. With >35,000 museums in the US alone offering vast open educational resources (OER) for teachers to use in their classrooms, we will explore and analyze OER to enhance lesson planning and engage students with collections both at the museum and remotely. With visits to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Barnes Foundation, and the Institute of Contemporary Art to explore and extend the online experience into the physical space. We will draw in the galleries, and apply our collective online and in-person museum experiences into curriculum planning for the classroom. Open to K-12 teachers in all subject areas.

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Leadership in Educational Technology
ETEC 523NM 01
Scott Duggan
  • Fall 2017
  • Oct 23 to Nov 20
  • Mon, Wed 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Chester County IU

Have you ever been approached by your colleagues as a technology resource in the classroom? Have you ever been asked to deliver a technology training session? Do you see yourself as the technology lead at your school? You will leave this course with the ability to design and deliver technology direction and optimize digital learning environments both within the classroom and across your school or District. We will explore the history of modern-day educational technology, the psychology of media, and the relationship of each to your role as an ed tech leader and advocate. Our final project will be a research-based technology plan for your school or District.

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Non-Fiction Film Production for the High School Classroom
VPAS 594NM 01
Michael Attie
  • Summer 2017
  • Aug 07 to Aug 11
  • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
UArts

With the advent of affordable, high-quality video cameras and highly accessible computer-based editing systems, documentary filmmaking has become an increasingly popular storytelling medium for high school students. The camera opens up new worlds to high school students in profound and revolutionary ways. Explore the documentary form, experiment with a wide range of affordable production and post-production tools, and come away with interview strategies, lighting and sound basics, proficiency using technical gear, and the foundation for developing rubrics for film-based projects to use in your classroom. Recommended for high school teachers. No previous filmmaking experience necessary.

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Online Tools + Collaboration in Education
ETEC 505NM 01
Cynthia Willits
  • Fall 2017
  • Sep 25 to Oct 30
CS Online Course

Educators can now empower their students to connect, create, and collaborate online. Explore the use of technology as a tool to engage students in constructive critical thinking about the subjects they study. User-friendly Web 2.0 tools, tools provide opportunities for educators and students to communicate and interact in new, collaborative ways. Lesson guides provide practical examples of techniques to integrate these online tools into the curriculum.

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Photography: Who Are We? Constructing Identity Through Images
UTPS 503NM 01
Jordan Rockford
  • Summer 2017
  • Aug 07 to Aug 11
  • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
UArts

Photography has always been a democratic medium and virtually anyone can make a photograph, but learning how to read images and understand what they tell us about ourselves and others is often overlooked. Participants learn how to use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons that incorporate concepts of visual literacy. Participants examine how photography influences identity and how it can be used as a teaching tool in grades K-12. Course activities include field trips for an insider's look into local archives and museums. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to social science, identity, expression and literacy are explored.

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Photography: Who Are We? Constructing Identity Through Images
ED 8133 01
Jordan Rockford
  • Summer 2017
  • Aug 07 to Aug 11
  • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
UArts

Photography has always been a democratic medium and virtually anyone can make a photograph, but learning how to read images and understand what they tell us about ourselves and others is often overlooked. Participants learn how to use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons for the classroom that incorporate concepts of visual literacy. Participants examine how photography influences identity and how it can be used as a teaching tool in grades K-12. Course activities include field trips for an insider's look into local archives and museums and hands-on photographic projects. Content is appropriate for a range of subject areas as connections to social science, identity, expression and literacy are explored.

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Posters for the People - Using WPA Sources
UTPS 504NM 01
Ennis Carter
  • Summer 2017
  • Aug 07 to Aug 11
  • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
UArts

In the 1930s, the United States was in crisis. The economic system had collapsed and one-quarter of the country's workforce was unemployed. In an effort to rebuild the nation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched the 'Works Progress Administration' (WPA) to put millions of jobless people back to work. To promote its vast social programs, the WPA commissioned 500 artists nationwide to created more than 35,000 posters and prints to reach the American public. Of the mere 2,000 posters known to still exist, the Library of Congress' collection is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph and woodcut posters publicized health programs, cultural programs, theatrical and musical performances, travel, education and community activities throughout the U.S. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library's holdings in the 1940s. In this course, learn about the WPA - its artists and its mission - and its connection to history, art, social science and visual literacy that can enrich your teaching. Participants learn about this time period, the power of design to communicate and how to use visual primary sources to engage students. In addition to museum visits, design studio exercises and hands-on printmaking, participants will use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons based on these powerful historic images. Content is appropriate for every subject areas as connections to art, nature, history, material processes and literacy are explored.

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Posters for the People - Using WPA Sources
ED 8135 01
Ennis Carter
  • Summer 2017
  • Aug 07 to Aug 11
  • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
UArts

In the 1930s, the United States was in crisis. The economic system had collapsed and one-quarter of the country's workforce was unemployed. In an effort to rebuild the nation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched the 'Works Progress Administration' (WPA) to put millions of jobless people back to work. To promote its vast social programs, the WPA commissioned 500 artists nationwide to created more than 35,000 posters and prints to reach the American public. Of the mere 2,000 posters known to still exist, the Library of Congress' collection is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph and woodcut posters publicized health programs, cultural programs, theatrical and musical performances, travel, education and community activities throughout the U.S. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library's holdings in the 1940s. In this course, learn about the WPA - its artists and its mission - and its connection to history, art, social science and visual literacy that can enrich your teaching. Participants learn about this time period, the power of design to communicate and how to use visual primary sources to engage students. In addition to museum visits, design studio exercises and hands-on printmaking, participants will use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons based on these powerful historic images. Content is appropriate for every subject areas as connections to art, nature, history, material processes and literacy are explored.

View Full Course Details